Humble Rants 23 January 2013

Posted Wednesday, January 23, 2013 in Opinion

Humble Rants 23 January 2013

by Robert Skoglund, aka The humble Farmer

MLK Day

Today my mind turns to a man who stopped by the house last summer to buy some humor CDs to give to his friend who was "opening a play on Broadway."

He told me he was a writer. I'd never heard of him, but bought two of his books thru Amazon and read enough in both of them to open my eyes. I don't think anyone could read Taylor Branch without having it change the way they look at the world.

In the 1960's bad things were happening to a group of people who were not allowed to learn how to read or vote. And very bad things happened to people who tried to vote. --- The worst of which was being shot and having their homes burned down.  --- Although that might have been easier than being hung by the arms on hooks and beaten in prisons.

I suppose the hardest part of reading about these sick things that happened in this Land Of The Free is realizing that in every age and land there are sadistic goons who enjoy beating people to a pulp. Or even enjoy simply talking about the cracking of knee joints. You just find it hard to believe that they are in your neighborhood and are people you know.

You've never heard me tell this story:  Around 1970 a black man applied for a job in Knox County. He was, of course, hired at once as management knew that a bureaucratic roof would fall in if a black man was refused employment. He turned out to be a great worker, but quit after two weeks. The boss called him in, sweating in his shoes, for fear that someone had said or done something to offend him --- and that the company would be fined by some government agency. The boss told the man that he was a great worker and that he hoped that nobody had done or said anything to him that made him want to quit. 

The man said that all was well at work, but some of his neighbors in Waldoboro told him that it might be a good idea if he wasn't living there tomorrow.

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